The Inverse of the Summit

P1070184

White Peaks, Derbyshire, taken on a walking holiday

Most people who enjoy hiking know that getting to the top of a mountain can be difficult. But for those who are experienced, perhaps after about 40 years of climbing those mountains, we begin to understand that it is the descent that is actually the more challenging of the two. Sure, you become breathless as you make your way slowly up the mountainside, sweat on your brow and your legs muscles pumping.  But on the way down, you have to take special care, your balance comes into play, and one wrong move can leave you stranded on that mountainside awaiting rescue.

And it’s this analogy that I’ve come to understand as the integration of those rare moments of epiphany in our lives. Getting to the mountaintop can be the easy part; coming back home can be the more difficult. We got to the top, now we’re on our return journey, tired, but taking the memory and experience with us to internalise. Having the epiphany is easy – integrating it into every day is the more difficult part of the journey. It’s the inverse of the mountain’s peak, and once we’ve traversed this sometimes treacherous way, it’s then that we can find that lovely and level middle ground.

It doesn’t matter whether it was a small realisation or a grand epiphany that you’ve come to in your life; the really important thing is how to integrate it into your soul and your life. You can’t just have it and then forget about it – or, you could, but then what’s the point? The real point is to make it a part of your life, each and every day. To live the realisation, to make it a reality.

And it’s not easy. Our everyday lives can be so busy, and filled with a plethora of tasks and minutiae that can take precedence unless we are careful about how we manage our integration. It’s all good to go on a retreat, to meditate, to do pathworking or journeying work, even spellwork, but then it’s up to us to bring that into our lives as well, and not just let it rest “out there in the universe”. We have to make it manifest, we have to make time and integrate the work. We have to come down that mountain.

And it can seem dull and boring, all the repetitive tasks that we have to do each day, when we’d rather be receiving even more epiphanies. We have to do the dishes, clean the bathroom, cook our meals, teach our kids, feed the cats, mow the lawn, pay the bills, etc. We have to get on with the chores of the day.

P1050224 (2)

My little Kiri cat 🙂

But these elements, numerous as they are, form such a large part of our lives. So why shouldn’t we make them even more special, and give them more significance? Why can’t we internalise our hard work and let that inspiration flow out in everything that we do? It’s all a matter of perspective. On the summit, it’s easy to see all around you, to have that greater perspective. Scooping out the poop in the kitty litter box isn’t nearly as grand.

But that revelatory experience doesn’t have to fade with time. We can carry that in our souls, even when we’re running to the bin with a very stinky scoop of poop. For me, the act of service helps me to continue my revelatory experiences in everything that I do. It’s something that we’ve always taught at Druid College, and something which I’ve expanded even further in my studies and work with the Sisterhood of Avalon. That service, whether it’s working for your community or taking care of your stinky cats can be the thing that connects you to everything else. It is in those moments of interconnection that we realise that we are all a part of a greater tapestry of life, woven from many threads, stronger and even more beautiful when we support each other.

That larger perspective is carried in our hearts and minds, and into everything that we do, from the choices we make each and every day to the way we interact with people every single moment. And it’s not easy. Coming down the mountain there are loose rocks and stones that can trip us up or roll under our feet, causing us to lose our balance, wrench our knee, put our back out. But if we’re careful, if we’re mindful, we can hopefully get back to everyday life intact and in good condition to keep that momentum going. There are the pitfalls of losing our way, losing the daylight, losing the map or compass. But unless we’re really unlucky, most of us will make it back and into our nice, warm homes where we can integrate fully the experience. And it’s keeping that feeling in our hearts as we go about our daily tasks can be equally as challenging. That is the real inverse of the summit.

But once we have achieved that, then we find the level path that allows us a good vantage point, and is much easier to manage as well. We find that balance point in our heart and souls, and the way forward becomes more pleasant. So the next time you reach that mountaintop in your life, find a word that summarises the experience, something that you can recall when you are cleaning a clogged drain, dealing with a difficult neighbour, or sitting in a lonely silence. This is what you can use to make the vision real, to make the intangible, tangible. Manifest this in your life, and then all that work will truly be worth it.

1

The valley where I grew up in Quebec, taken from the lovely and level trail of an old disused railway.

If you’ve enjoyed this post, please do consider becoming a Patron on my Patreon Page, or donating through a contribution or subscription to this blog HERE

Book Review: Seasons of Moon and Flame

Seasons of Moon and FlameI’ve just been introduced to Danielle Dulsky’s work, and I have to say, it’s been a pure joy to read Seasons of Moon and Flame: The Wild Dreamer’s Epic Journey of Becoming. Dulsky is the author of The Holy Wild, which I shall have to put on my list as well!

It’s been a long time since I’ve read a book that is so poetic. Her style of writing is just pure poetry – there is no other way to describe it. It took me a while to get into that headspace, but after the first chapter I was there, riding the currents of imagery and information, of inspiration and imagination. It’s encouraged me to be more poetic in my own work, for sure!

Seasons of Moon and Flame is a journey that takes you throughout the moons of the year, connecting with the energies of that enigmatic, wild and wisdom-filled Hag. The elder who tells us what we need to hear, but doesn’t couch her words. The one who teaches us without molly-coddling. The one whose lessons can be grasped as easily as plucking dandelion seeds floating on the breeze, or has hard won as climbing a steep and lonely mountain.

The key word is “wild”. Using the archetype of the Hag, the grandmother, the sacred Elder, this is a book for the mystic, the nature mystic whose heart beats alongside the earth’s heartbeat, whose soulsong is as enchanted and free as the hawk that soars on the thermals. Seasons of Moon and Flame teaches us to live in balance and harmony, with our selves and with the natural world around us, allowing the inspiration of nature to show us how to live our lives accordingly, in tune to the cycles of life. Our own stories are epic myths that must be lived. We hear the grandmothers calling, calling out their pain, their triumphs, and we know that we share in their stories. The Hag tells us to stop, to listen, to really be in the moment, to experience this for all it’s worth, because we are the living generation, now, today, that foretells the future of generations to come. We are Her children, and we will become Her in time, wiser and wrinkled, with a mischievous smile behind our eyes and the knowledge of the world in our bones.

This book is full of practical knowledge, rituals that you can perform, stories from our ancestral past and the poetry of today. Each moon we follow what is happening in the wild around us, exploring the nature of nature in our souls and in our environment. The final lesson of the Hag is as follows:

“Our Bones Want Belonging.

In the end, we all want to belong. We will go to all lengths to feel we belong to something, to some tradition or group. We will overidenifty with flawed organizations, let ourselves be hazed, shun the whole parts of ourselves, leaving them forgotten in shadow, while we put others in the spotlight in order to appear special or good. All the while, we do belong to great and immense collectives. We all have rich Earth-based ancestries if we go back far enough, We all have immense ancestral stores we can use to bolster our resilience and work for a broader, more just, more whole world. Our bones want belonging in a postcolonial world, and our grand story is not about questing and running, not about journeying so far from who we are or what we have become; it is a story of coming home to the house of the hag, returning to a place that part of us – the better part, maybe – never ever left.”

This book is a great guide post to walking in our own true nature. We walk with the hags of Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter, and they teach us to come home to ourselves. Their lessons help us to remember our selves, to remember who we are in a world that tries to tell us differently. With this book, we  definitely come home.

New podcast is now up!

My Elements mini-series podcast now has its fourth installment. This mini-series is available for free on my YouTube channel. You can also listen to all the other podcasts, along with audiobooks, meditations and more with my Bandcamp subscription.

 

Spring Equinox – Riding the Energies

Tomorrow is the Spring Equinox in the northern hemisphere, the time when the days become longer than the nights, when the sun crosses the celestial equator. It’s a tipping point in the cycle, where new energies come into play. This crossover, this shifting of energies happens over and over again, in a never-ending cycle of the seasons, the play and dance of the sun across our planet’s sphere. How do we work with these energies?

Right now our world is in imbalance, and we see that reflected in everything around us. It can be devastating when one follows an earth-based tradition. The rampant destruction of nature, our capitalistic, over-consumption culture and the degradation of cohesive and compassionate communities is at an all-time high. We are seeing the effects each and every day, on the news and social media, an influx of information 24/7 that our brains aren’t wired to handle, which only leads to more stress and fear.

P1030836 small

As followers of an earth-based tradition, how do we cope with all this? We watch our consumption, we give back, we do the ecologically and socially responsible things. But we still have to cope with the stress, the fear, the despair sometimes. When it all gets too much, what can we do? For me, there are two answers. Watching funny David Bowie interviews (really, that man was not only a genius, but exceptionally funny!) and getting out in nature.

Getting outdoors is perhaps the best medicine we have, if we are able to get outside into the fresh air and sunlight, feeling the wind on our faces or looking at the vast expanse of stars overhead. For those who are not mobile, I know that this can present a problem, and we have to work with this as best we can, even if it is to sit by an open window for five minutes (close the doors to the room so you don’t lose all the heat in your home). If you live in a city, try to get out to a park (if you aren’t in quarantine). Any way you can, try to commune with nature, to refresh those bonds in our hearts and minds, to remind us of the beauty, power and strength that lies all around us, all the time. If you’re lucky enough to live in the countryside, so much the better.

P1030857 (2)

We can also work for ourselves, to strengthen our hearts and bodies, to connect with nature, our gods, the ancestors, the spirits of place, the fey folk. We can use the inspiration of nature. There is magic all around us, in the water that comes from our taps, in the air that we breathe, in the candle’s flame and in the earth beneath our feet. We can work with these energies to help us physically, mentally and spiritually. We are a creative bunch. There are no limits for the work that we can do with nature all around us. If we use the energies of the Spring Equinox on top of all these other energies, we are making good use of the time and tides of our lives.

P1030914 small

Tap into the energies of the growing light if you live in the northern hemisphere (or the energies of the growing darkness in the southern hemisphere) for your work. Pray, do magic, meditate, commune, establish your own personal connection to these energies. Work with the flow, not against it. Listen to the voices of the gods and goddesses, the ancestors, the Fair Folk. What do they have to tell you about right now? What advice can they give, and what can you do, for yourself and the world around you, to make it a better place? How can you be a better functioning part of your ecosystem? How can you ride the tide of this very special time, to do the work that you need to do?

As a suggestion, in the northern hemisphere, at the equinox we can do work to increase health, compassion, love, holistic living,  and peace using these energies. In the southern hemisphere, we can work with the energies to decrease panic, war, anger, ill-health and so on. It can be difficult to ride these incredible waves of energy at this time of year. Everything is thrown up in the air, and it only settles come the next holiday, whether that be Beltane or Samhain, depending on where you live. That is the time when we begin to see the manifestation of the energies, the reality of the situation. At the equinoxes, the energy is ethereal and wild, like the wind. But we can harness that energy, with a little imagination, courage and determination. We are the practitioners of the magical arts. We are the Dreamweavers and the Shamans, the Druids, the Witches, the Wiccans and everything else. We are the earth itself, she is us and we are Her. We only have to remember that, in order to live in balance and right relationship.

P1030932 small

Let’s use our hearts, our minds, our imagination. Let’s work for the benefit of all. Let’s take care of each other, and be the example that we want to see in the world. Things are difficult for most, yes, but we can help each other. We are not alone, we live with everything else on this planet. Our interconnectedness is what makes us strong, and our forgetfulness of this relationship is our downfall. Do what you can to make your environment strong and healthy, for everyone concerned, human and hon-human. Work your magic, pray by the moon, use the energies of the equinox to bring about change. Remember the Old Ways and the Old Ones, use the brilliance of current technology combined with the magic of herbs and stones. Use the gifts that lie all around us, and give back to the earth and each other. Take great care of each other.

Blessings of the equinox to you all.

P1030939 small

If you enjoy these blog posts and would like to support me in creating more content, please do consider becoming a patron on my Patreon page or donating here on this blog. 

Of Chalk and Flint – A book review

Of Chalk & Flint - Paperback Edition cover gallery imageVal Thomas’ Of Chalk and Flint: A Way of Norfolk Magic was the first book I bought this year. And I have a feeling that it will be the best book I’ve read all year, or for many years!

Of Chalk and Flint is a large tome of magical information rooted in the chalk and flint of Norfolk, in East Anglia, UK. Though it is a sizeable book, the material presented within is honest, without pretention and still hugely informative without being academically dry. We get an insight into how those of the Nameless Tradition within Norfolk work, their vision of deity, of the powers of nature that surround them, of the times and tides, the history and the lore of this eastern county. Though I’m a Suffolk girl now, I used to live in Norwich, and then in Loddon, and I can relate to many of the places and the history presented in this book. It’s a wonderful and inspiring book, to get you deeper into your own tradition, wherever you live.

It begins by looking at the Lord and Lady of Norfolk, the deities represented in local form, the goddess and the god. Here in my part of Suffolk, the Lord of Flint is all around, on the heath and in the fields, on the shoreline and in the forests. The Lady of Chalk resides on the other side of the A12 from where I live, and so The Lady for me here is the Birch Lady, whose trees are everywhere, or otherwise the Lady of Sand, as the arid soil where I live is abundant, both on the heath, in the forest and beneath the shingle of the beaches. Thomas’ view of deity inspired me to deepen my own connection to the land where I live, to open my heart to the deities even more, and to know them by naming them.

The second chapter looks at sacred places, and consists of local lore combined with accounts of energies and magical workings that the author and others have enjoyed at various sites around Norfolk. We then move to Spiritual Beings in chapter three, where we are given the lore of such creatures as the merfolk and the ferishers (fairies), again which sing to my heart as near to where I live we have the tale of the Merman of Orford, as well as a host of ferishers, frairies, pharisees, faeries and more.

We then move onto the Quest of the Year, where the author in great and exquisite detail gives us an account of the seasonal celebrations, the flora and fauna that abounds, rites and ritual ideas from the Nameless Tradition of witchcraft. It makes you want to take up spinning, or whip up some homemade marmalade, or visit certain places at midsummer. Following chapters include materia magica, items that can be used in the Nameless Tradition, such as holey stones and the like as well as magical tools, working magic effectively, information on coven working and public gatherings and moots, and famous practitioners from Norfolk.

The way that Thomas writes makes you feel at home. It’s as if you’re sitting down to have a cup of tea with your favourite aunt, while she spins stories or thread on a spinning wheel. You can almost smell the herbs drying from the rafters, and feel the sun beating down on your head out in the Brecklands as you traverse the landscape. This book takes you through the wonder of this county like a friend would, and this is a friend I would trust wholly, for it is clear that she walks her talk, without arrogance or humility, but with a sense of pride in the natural lore, and an honest presentation that comes from the true wisdom gleaned from marrying intelligence and experience.

I cannot recommend this book enough. It is available from Troy Books. I may save up my pennies to buy a hard-cover copy, to treasure for the rest of my life.

New Podcast Now Up!

Here is the latest in the Elements podcast mini-series, where we look at the element of fire. Hope you enjoy! You can download the entire podcast series, as well as everything else on my Bandcamp page, with a subscription.